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Not-So-Great Moments in Safety: Locked Doors

What’s the hazard here? If this door could speak, I think its story might go something like this...Back when this building went up I was installed without a doorknob and got this fancy vertical handle because it was more durable. The whole place was coated with gray paint and we lived happily for a while. Since I lead outside, I need to be kept locked to secure the building from the outside in. I’ve had a number of different bolt locks over the years, but they break and this one is the latest and has lasted the longest. A while back, we had an insurance audit and the person told us I needed a label to remind people not to use the bolt lock when people were working in here. You can see how that turned out, I’m locked now and people are working at the moment. A couple of years ago we had an OSHA inspection and I got a citation for being locked while the building was occupied. The OSHA inspector said one way to ensure I always stayed unlocked during business hours was to install some panic hardware. Panic hardware or a panic bar means a door can always be locked on the outside and never on the inside. It’s really a perfect solution. So we did that and I got the panic bar. We should’ve removed the bolt lock when I got the panic bar, but that didn’t happen. Then, in some weirdness, the panic bar wasn’t installed properly and the latch didn’t catch quite right, so I kept blowing open during strong winds. That’s when the maintenance department came up with this pipe and those holders to keep me closed. Fixing the panic bar would’ve been a better fix, but I didn’t get to choose. All I know, is that I’m sort of embarrassed about how I look...


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Jill's Safety Corner

The Incidental Safety Professional

The Incidental Safety Professional

“What do you do for a living?” 

Safety...  Safety Professional...  Safety Engineer... Environmental Health & Safety…Chief Safety Officer...

“Huh?”

Wouldn’t these interactions be easier if you could answer with “accountant”?...


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Violence Prevention: Part One

Violence Prevention: Part One

When you think of violence prevention, who are you thinking of protecting? 

What sort of violence is top of mind as you read this?

Each day we personally experience, witness, or read about violence.

Road rage; bullying; words or...


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Understanding Safety Leadership for CEOs & Management Teams
"I’ve heard that ‘safety starts at the top’, right? Well, I’m at the top—can you help me understand what that means?"That was the question a CEO recently asked me. This question is like winning the lottery for a safety professional, and it’s an incredibly intelligent question for a leader to be asking. For the safety professional, having a leader acknowledge that workplace safety success begins with corporate leadership’s advocacy, is the often unrealized dream of the profession. In 20 years of this practice, I have yet...

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Not-So-Great Moments in Safety: OSHA Approved
Demo our Ladder Safety CourseWhat’s the hazard here? The hazard is misinformation. There is no such thing as “OSHA Approved.” Though this term of OSHA Approved is often thrown around regarding various types of tools and equipment and even training, it’s a false claim, an alternate fact. OSHA does not have an approval board or branch of the division to approve items. What you will see if you read fine-print or labels on equipment are terms such as, “Meets OSHA requirements” or “Built to OSHA specifications.” As for the term, Safety...

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Not-So-Great Moments in Safety: Unprotected Wall Openings
Demo our Personal Fall Arrest Systems CourseWhat’s the hazard here? Both employees are exposed to a fall hazard. Both, really? It seems obvious the person standing on the window framing is more at risk of falling, however, the person on the interior is exposed to a fall hazard as well. The situation we have here is called a wall opening and the wall opening (in this case, a window) is creating a fall hazard. Any time an employee is exposed to a fall hazard of 4-feet or more in a General Industry setting or 6-feet or more in a...

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Top 10 Warning Signs of Safety Training Fatigue
In each training session, at least one employee falls asleep. You’ve taken to bringing an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) to training sessions in case an employee suddenly begins ‘dying’ of boredom. When you ask a question about the training topic, no employee has the energy to raise their hand to answer. You spend more time at your desk creating new PowerPoint slides, than in the actual high-hazard working environments you manage. You spend more time in the classroom watching people watch old safety DVDs, than facilitating...

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The DIY Approach to Safety Training Development
First, you’ll want to review the learning objectives and topics covered to see if the content is relevant and that it fulfills your regulatory and/or compliance requirements. You’ll also want to check that the content is interactive and engaging so your students will pay attention and learn. Depending on your needs, you’ll want to know what testing options are available. And a final thing to consider is whether it meets your culture, organizational, and generational objectives.Building in-house can work great if you have the...

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