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Power Generation 1910.269

 

Learning Objectives

  • Identify and apply appropriate general safety practices for working in power generation facilities (including hydrogen and anhydrous-ammonia precautions).
  • Apply appropriate safety practices for guarding equipment and energized parts.
  • Apply appropriate safety practices when working on boilers and related chlorine systems.
  • Apply appropriate safety practices when working with coal and ash.

Available in English

20 minutes

Mobile Ready

What is deadliest source of power in the U.S.? According to Forbes, energy produced from coal has a mortality rate of about 15,000 per trillion kilowatt hours, from 44% of U.S. electricity. The safest, statistically? Nuclear and wind power production.

Electrical power generation facilities create immense amounts of energy through various means, each presenting unique hazards associated with production. From hydroelectric dams and wind turbines, to nuclear power plants and coal burning operations, there are different risks associated with each high-risk environment.

There are certain steps you should take to prevent accidents and injuries in a power generation facility, mainly related to working safely around special machinery and controlling for hazardous energy.

If you’ve ever seen the gruesome result of a complex machinery accident, then you will appreciate the need for machine safeguards. When we talk about safeguards, we’re talking about simple devices that make it difficult for workers to injure themselves while working on a machine, like a shield or guard to protect from sparks, or a grate that keeps them away from the churning part of a rotary blade. Provide and maintain sufficient access and working space around electric equipment to permit ready and safe operation and maintenance.

Utility workers are familiar with electricity as a hazardous energy that must be controlled or harnessed to be used effectively. In order for workers to safely perform equipment maintenance and repair, the equipment must be isolated from all hazardous energy sources for the duration of the work. Valves, switches, and other mechanical devices are used to control the flow of energy. When properly closed, opened, or disengaged, these devices isolate energy from the equipment. Maintain interlocks and other safety devices in a safe, operable condition. They should not be modified to defeat their function, except for test or repair.

Rooms and spaces with exposed live parts must be guarded during specific operating conditions…

 

50 to 150 volts: Rooms and spaces must be guarded if they contain exposed live parts operating at this voltage to ground located within 8 feet of the floor or other working surface.

151 to 600 volts: Rooms and spaces must be guarded if they contain live parts operating at this voltage unless the live parts are enclosed within grounded, metal-enclosed equipment, whose only openings are designed to deflect foreign objects; or, the live parts are installed at a height above the floor or any other working surface that provides corresponding to the protection provided by an 8-foot height at 50 volts.

More than 600 volts: Rooms and spaces must be guarded if they contain live parts operating at this voltage unless the live parts are enclosed within grounded, metal-enclosed equipment, whose only openings are designed to deflect foreign objects; or, the live parts are installed at a height above the floor or any other working surface that provides corresponding to the protection provided by an 8-foot height at 50 volts.

To prevent unauthorized access, rooms and spaces must:

  • Be enclosed within fences, screens, partitions, or walls
  • Display posted “keep out” warning signs
  • Be kept locked if not under the observation of an attendant
  • Not be entered while electric supply lines or equipment are energized

Preventing Contact with Energized Equipment:

  • Provide guards around all live parts operating at more than 150 volts to ground without an insulating covering, unless the location of the live parts gives sufficient protection.
  • Energized parts within a compartment must be guarded during operation and maintenance functions, except for fuse replacement and other necessary access by qualified persons.
  • When guards are removed from energized equipment, install barriers around the work area.

Boiler work can be dirty, grimy business—and potentially dangerous. A designated worker must inspect conditions before any work is permitted and after its completion. Eye protection, or full-face protection if necessary, is to be worn at all times when condenser, heater, or boiler tubes are being cleaned. Shielding must also be installed at the tube ends where workers are cleaning.

Areas where chemical cleaning is in progress must be cordoned off. If flammable liquids, gases, vapors or combustible materials will be used or might be produced during the cleaning process, the area must be posted with signs restricting entry and warning of the hazards of fire and explosion. Smoking, welding, and other possible ignition sources are prohibited in these restricted areas.

Safety requirements in boiler work:

  • Limit personnel in restricted areas.
  • Restricted areas require protective clothing, boots, goggles, and gloves.
  • Ready access to water or showers for emergency use.

Furnace and boiler precautions:

  • Before repair work begins, inspect overhead areas for possible falling objects.
  • If falling object hazards exist, provide overhead protection such as planking or nets.
  • When opening an operating boiler door, stand clear to avoid the blast of heat and gases.
Course Outline
  • Introduction
  • General Safety Measure
  • Guarding Equipment and Energized Parts
  • Boiler and Chlorine Managment
  • Coal and Ash Handling
Regulations
  • 29 CFR, Subpart R: Special Industries – 1910.269, Section (v): Power generation
  • 29 CFR, Subpart H: Hazardous waste operations and emergency response – 1910.120 (g)(3): Personal protective equipment selection
  • 29 CFR, Subpart H: Hazardous Materials – 1910.111: Storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia
  • 29 CFR, Subpart I: Personal Protective Equipment – 1910.132: General requirements
  • 29 CFR, Subpart I: Personal Protective Equipment – 1910.133: Eye and face protection
  • 29 CFR, Subpart I: Personal Protective Equipment – 1910.134: Respiratory protection
  • National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) – safe work practices for non-thermal power-generation facilities
  • NFPA 70E: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace – safe work practices for non-thermal power-generation facilities